Uv Mapping For Mac

0930

This is in response to a request for help from Gadget Girl in her thread, WIP Shepard Robe for Dusk. First, I'm on a PC not a Mac, but I can't imagine Blender itself works any differently. That said, the screenshot GadgetGirl provided in her thread, looks as though she was on the right track.

Now for the most part, I usually unwrap meshes I've created in Blender (or Silo) from scratch, so since GG is working with the Shepard Robe she created in MD, I decided to import one of my older MD3 meshes to see what she was seeing, and I see there are 2 methods Angular and Conformal. I assumed, since she wanted this to be a conformed robe, she chose Conformal. In either case, once she clicked Unwrap, it was unwrapped.

This tutorial will describe my current method of UV mapping clothing models for use in Poser. Until recently, getting a user-friendly flat map has been either expensive or tedious; but this article will describe a method using only free applications. This is a great way to place maps and pinpoint areas on the uv surface for texturing. The testmap_help.jpeg shows the testmap used with Photoshop.

The reason it looks like it hasn't happened yet, is because she wasn't viewing the UV Editor window. The following posts are what I posted to help set up Blender for viewing both the 3D View window, where you do your modeling, and the UVImage Editor window, where you set up your UV Map layout. OK, hopefully this will help get you started. First, be sure to mark your seams first, or what you'll see in the UV Editor is not anything you'll be able to work with.

Usually I mark seams across shoulders, and down side seams. Since Gadget Girl's Shepard Robe has long sleeves, I suggested she should also mark around the armholes, where the sleeves attach to the front and back, AS WELL AS, under the arm. In fact, I would probably start at the cuff and mark the seam(s) that would go from the cuff down to the hem.

That way the seam for the sleeve will match the seam for the front and back, and there won't be a problem matching everything up when texturing. Now to set up the split screens, hover your mouse over the top of your workspace, just below where it states the version of Blender you're using, until you see a double pointed cursor and a small popup for Area Options, and choose Split Area, and drag your mouse to about the middle of your workspace, and release your mouse button.

What you'll now see is a duplicate of the Edit mode on the right half as well, so next click on the icon to the left of the View menu and choose UVImage Editor. To the right of the UVs menu should be an icon and some choices.

Click the 'X' to delete the blank 'image' Blender shows you by default. What you'll see then is the UV mapping area. In order to see your Mesh on the left side AND the UV Map on the right side without having it all selected, click on the little icon with the cube and the arrow pointing up to the left. Now you'll be able to see everything whether you have the robe selected or not. Hopefully, that helped.

Click to expand.For some reason, whomever designed the current UI decided all menus and buttons should be at the bottom of whatever 'window' you're using. Not sure why that was decided, perhaps because that's how the Windows Taskbar is by default, and they thought folks who left it there would be more familiar with having menus and buttons at the bottom of the windows.

shrug Of course, Blender is also available for Mac and Linux, so don't know if their UIs also have their navigation set up that way or not. Click to expand.Yeah, the setup is the same.

Blender is one of those programs that although there is a mac version, it's not really designed for the Mac. So at the top of the screen I actually have a set of extra menus. The default, can't be a program on a mac without at least the Apple, and then the actual useful blender bars.

In terms of usability not a big deal, it just means they aren't using any of the built in Mac UI elements but porting over an entire UI set, probably from something like wxPython. Actually it's kind of a good thing because it does mean in terms of layout the mac is identical to to a pc and probably linux so tutorial images are the same and things are in the same place. Hello, Miss B, please allow me to interject here regarding your opening post.

The two algorithms (angular/conformal) have nothing to do with choosing because one is creating a conforming clothing object. Poser/DAZ Studio work has no baring on this. They are the two algorithms one can choose for mapping in the LSCM (Least Squares Conformal Mapping) UV mapping (which Blender defaults to with seam-line unwrapping). One would choose the best one according to the mesh to get the least amount of distortion on their maps, and you can even mix them per UV Islands dependent on best usage.

There is a distortion viewer you can activate within the UV parameters (N Panel in UV section - where you find parameters to change the UV lines, etc.). It is color coordinated from flattened (no distortions) being dark blue through severe distortions being red, with a gamut of yellow/green for the intermediaries describing either compression or expansion (red is either extreme compression, or extreme expansion). With that being said, why would one want to re-map a Marvelous Designer creation? I have done it on several occasions, but one can not get back to the nearly perfect flattened algorithm employed by MD's UV mapping (already flattened pattern pieces with clearly defined seam lines). I suggest before any re-mapping attempts, one to open up the mesh in Blender's UV screen and view the mapping (with the distortion viewer even).

If it is a matter of consolidating/restructuring (spacing purposes, etc.) the UV map, you can do that in Blender as well without messing up the flattened islands, and then saving out a new OBJ with the enhanced/corrected mapping. As an aside, that is a beautiful example of UV mapping there, Miss B, and I love the design of your dress. That is a good mini-tut to help those get started UV mapping, and setting up the environment, but don't forget, Blender by default, already has a UV (room/section) set up by default. Gadget Girl, in the image you posted, the box to the right of the header drop-down selections that says 'default' is the room/sections drop-down selection box (click on the arrows section). It will reveal a bunch of different Blender setups (rooms, if you will) that you can switch back and forth from (default being, well, the default 'room'). There is a UV one, as well as several others. You can also create your own.

For example; following Miss B's tut, once set up, press the + (plus sign) to the right of the word 'default' in that box. It will create a new room/section named default.001 which you can change to whatever you like by clicking on the lettering. Once you have your new room, don't forget to re-save your start-up file (In header 'File' drop-down list, or CTRL - U or whatever is the MAC equivalent of CTRL). If you do not save your start-up file, when you close Blender you will loose any customization you create. Another thing; Blender is highly customizable, and except for the default Header (pictured in your post), which is the same in every software across all platforms, all 'section' headers (the ones you say are at the bottom) can be switched from bottom to top/vice-versa, and even hidden.

Uv Mapping For Mac

To do so, just right click on the header, and you will be presented with options. Choose according to your preferences. Hey DaremoK3, thanks for stopping in and explaining the Angular/Conformal options.

I was assuming, from what GG had stated, that Conformal was related to conforming clothing. That said, I don't usually do clothing modeling in Blender; mostly enviro/prop objects, but in the case of my MD3 dress (thanks for the compliment), I brought it into Blender because I don't like working with Tris, and I wasn't sure if my other modeling app, Silo, has the option to convert Tris to Quads. I'm used to using Quads, so converting the dress to Quads was done in Blender, not MD3. From what I understand, newer versions of MD will have the option to have Quads within it, so bringing it into Blender to convert wouldn't be necessary. Of course, now that I've gotten used to using Dynamic clothing in Poser, I probably would leave anything new I create in Tris, I just don't necessarily like it for Conforming clothes.

Hello, Gadget Girl. I was typing when you last posted, so this is in response. I admit, I haven't read your original thread on this, so I assumed she was helping with a re-mapping. Yes, if at all possible, it is best to leave MD's UV islands without redoing the algorithm, but go ahead and move them around till your hearts content within the 1-1 UV space (square UV box), and then re-save your mesh as a new OBJ with the new UV assignment, still keeping the near perfect UV islands intact. Yeah, the UV parameters of MD does have some shortcomings, but you can overcome them within MD with a little extra work (very little). I was the one in original MD2 releases (purchased when first came out) who worked with them (convinced them really) on the UV export shortcomings via testing/bug reporting which led them to add a secondary UV export structure; the 'Unified' UV export switch. If you select this upon export, your pattern islands will be encapsulated within an imaginary 1-1 UV square (hence unified), but there is a trade-off to this which is if you texture your work inside MD (including scaling/translating images on your patterns) you will lose all of your scaling/translating work.

In other words, your export will not resemble the texture work within MD, and you will have to recreate your texture work in outside software. The original algorithm utilizes out-of-bounds repeating UV bounds which allows for keeping scale/translation/rotation on your textures. Your exported mesh object will be identical to the one inside MD which is perfect for one off uses, but not for content creation. For content creation, one needs a unified 1-1 UV map within the bounds of UV space, so others can utilize your mapping as well (texture artists, customers who would like to customize texture sets, etc.).

So, that is the explanation, here is the work-flow technique: In MD, when you finish your creation, and before export, in the pattern window create a square pattern piece big enough to encapsulate all your pattern pieces (UV islands), and arrange them within (this will be your 1-1 UV space). Once all are arranged perfectly within the square, delete the square (not needed - just a visual aid), and then export your mesh creation and select 'unified' under UV section. There you have it. One-to-one UV mapping set up inside of MD. Mind you, I only have MD2. I have worked in MD3 and MD4 (not 5), but have never upgraded. There might be variances to the end work-flow, but you should have the gist.

Yeah, the UV parameters of MD does have some shortcomings, but you can overcome them within MD with a little extra work (very little). I was the one in original MD2 releases (purchased when first came out) who worked with them (convinced them really) on the UV export shortcomings via testing/bug reporting which led them to add a secondary UV export structure; the 'Unified' UV export switch. If you select this upon export, your pattern islands will be encapsulated within an imaginary 1-1 UV square (hence unified), but there is a trade-off to this which is if you texture your work inside MD (including scaling/translating images on your patterns) you will lose all of your scaling/translating work. In other words, your export will not resemble the texture work within MD, and you will have to recreate your texture work in outside software. The original algorithm utilizes out-of-bounds repeating UV bounds which allows for keeping scale/translation/rotation on your textures.

Your exported mesh object will be identical to the one inside MD which is perfect for one off uses, but not for content creation. For content creation, one needs a unified 1-1 UV map within the bounds of UV space, so others can utilize your mapping as well (texture artists, customers who would like to customize texture sets, etc.). So, that is the explanation, here is the work-flow technique: In MD, when you finish your creation, and before export, in the pattern window create a square pattern piece big enough to encapsulate all your pattern pieces (UV islands), and arrange them within (this will be your 1-1 UV space). Once all are arranged perfectly within the square, delete the square (not needed - just a visual aid), and then export your mesh creation and select 'unified' under UV section. There you have it.

One-to-one UV mapping set up inside of MD. Mind you, I only have MD2. I have worked in MD3 and MD4 (not 5), but have never upgraded. There might be variances to the end work-flow, but you should have the gist. Click to expand.Hmm. So I'm in MD 5 which does have a nice UV guide tool that shows you the square that the will equate to the UV. But I don't seem to get that 1-1 layout.

At least not as a file I can access lie a jpg or png. When I export from MD with the Unified UV checked I get three files the.obj file a.mtl file and a second mtl file which it adds 0.mtl to. This is why I was using Blender. I've stopped texturing in MD except to use a UV layout guide that helps me figure out how to adjust the pattern, because I've had to redo the texturing anyway. Sorry, Gadget Girl. I should have been clear on that part regarding the UV maps.

The UV map is only a data structure within the OBJ file format. They are defined as texture vector coordinates only, and you need a visualizer/exporter such as Blender, UV Mapper, UV-Viewer, etc. To actually create a tangible UV map that you can paint on. You load the OBJ into the software, and extract a visual UV map to paint in external software. For Blender, you can immediately paint maps within, and there are other software that does this as well. The other two I mentioned are specifically for UV Viewing and extracting a 2D UV image map to be painted in other software (Photoshop, GIMP, 3D painter software, etc.).

Personally, UV-Viewer by Dimension3D is my favorite, but UV Mapper is great as well. Check them out here (both free - well UV Mapper Classic is free version of UV Mapper): UV-Viewer: UV Mapper. Miss B: I'm the same way regarding conforming clothing.

I used to create a retopo-ed all quad Sub-D version for conforming clothes alongside my dynamic mesh for use in Poser/DS. Now, my work-flow usually just keeps me working with the dynamic meshes.

I found it a waste of my time, and too much extra work for my own use. If I was selling to the masses, then I would definitely package both versions, but for my own needs, I no longer bother with the quad retopos. And, ever since DAZ included Loop Sub-D algorithm in DS, I don't even have to export my work from MD at a low particle distance. I can leave everything default, Sub-D in DS, and add a Smooth Modifier if needed. Render wise - just as clean as all quad Sub-D.

But, then again, I am a NPR man, so I don't really have the needs the average user is expecting.

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Mapping

Suite of VR products to capture, render and stream scenes. SketchUp plugin for intergration. Fee - Windows, Mac, Linux. Fee - Windows, Mac - manual.

Real-time radiosity engine. Beta - Windows, Mac.

Fee. Windows. Free and Fee - Windows, Mac. ArtVPS - Interactive, photorealistic rendering, cloud rendering ability and Cloud Rendering Mobile Viewer. Able to render proxy substitutes placed in main SketchUp model. An extension working outside of the SketchUp environment, taking advantage of full computational abilities of your computer. Free, Fee - Windows, Mac.

Imports/Exports many formats and has integrated rendering and animation editions. Render with SiTex Graphics Air.

Free, Fee - Windows, Linux. FluidInteractive, Inc - Piranesi-like results (non-photorealistic). Thea Render - Integrated plugin. Fee - Windows, Mac.

Fee - Windows. Imagination Technologies Group - Minimal renderer that only uses the SketchUp sun as a light source. Free - Windows, Mac. Official support ended in May 2015. But this plugin can still be installed in SketchUp 2016 by moving a file and folder from the SketchUp 2015 installation. Windows.

Go to: C: ProgramData SketchUp SketchUp 2015 SketchUp Plugins. Copy folder named 'ImaginationVisualizer' folder and 'ImaginationVisualizer.rb' file. Paste into: C: ProgramData SketchUp SketchUp 2016 SketchUp Plugins.

Open SketchUp 2016. If the Visualizer icon did not load, go to the Window menu, then Preferences.

In the Extension tab, just check the box beside Visualizer and the icon will appear, as well as the Extension menu entry. Mac. Copy the folder and file from: Macintosh HD/Library/Application Support/SketchUp 2015/SketchUp/Plugins. Paste into: home/Library/Application Support/SketchUp 2016/SketchUp/Plugins ( You can find the library folder under the Go menu in Finder, hold down the Option key after you click on the Go menu and the Library folder will appear in the menu.). LesterP - Visualizer for SketchUp Scene Exporter add on. Fee.

Required DLLs may need to be added to system folders. thomthom - Plugin tools for inspecting normals and UV mapping. Matt666 - V-Ray specific material plugin. V-Ray sub-forum.

thomthom - A suite of plugin tools addressing issues with a floating license on a network (by making V-Ray load on demand), material and camera tools. Several functions useful for general use by people without V-Ray. External Programs.

Geometric Ltd - Near photo-realistic images and animation. Imports SKPs, GE integration. Fee - Windows. Fee. TIP: To get a good ATL file, it is often best to explode all the components and groups in your SKP model and then check for reversed faces, prior to exporting to ATL or saving the model for ATL to import. Not doing so often results into missing geometry or messed up materials in the ATL scene. AutoDesk.

Fee. Fee. SketchUp to Blender converter. Fee - Windows, Mac. Modeler/renderer. Fee - Mac.

SU plugin. Fee - Windows 32 and 64-bit. SU plugin. Fee - Windows, Mac. Real-time, global illumination renderer. Free beta - Windows, Mac.

SKIndigo, the SKP exporter. Fee - Windows, Mac, Linux. Free - SU2KT exporter - Windows, Mac, Linux. T.

Marek - Exports SketchUp camera positions to Kerkythea. Exporter to KeyShot 6. Other exporters available to KeyShot 4 and 5. Fee - Windows, Mac. Fee - SketchUp to LightWave book,. Free, Fee - Windows.

Open source. Testbed for the renderer LuxRender. Free.

exvion - Plugin for SmallLuxGPU. Fee -Windows. Fee -Windows, Mac, Linux. The stand-alone program works outside of the SketchUp environment, taking advantage of full computation resources - unlike the SketchUp extension version. Though now SketchUp 2015 supports 64-bit. A plugin to help with material assignment.

Accepts COLLADA, DAE imports. Free - Linux, Windows, Mac. Photo-real renderer of all major 3D file formats.

Includes PolyTrans, which converts 3D files to other formats. Fee - Windows. Suite of VR products to capture, render and stream scenes.

SketchUp plugin for intergration available. Fee - Windows, Mac, Linux. Photoshop.

SketchUp Skill Builder video. Photoshop rendering plugin. Import 2D SketchUp scene into Photoshop and render there. Fee - Windows. SketchUpArtists tutorials. Non-photorealistic - Fee.

Free - Windows, Mac. 3D Render Ltd - Virtual reality software supporting rendering effects. Windows.

Offers stereo vision renderings and rendering farm management - among other things. Free (watermarked), Fee - Windows. Modeler/renderer. Fee - Windows, Mac. Real-time web-based visualizations with physically accurate lighting. WebVR ready for virtual tours.

Uv Unwrap Mac

Fee - Windows. Didier Bur - Sunflow is a free renderer. Walk-, fly-thru rendered animation. Fee - Windows. Also has an integrated plugin.

Fee - Windows, Mac, Linux. Manipulate models in 3D. Compatible with all 3D BIM modelers, like SketchUp. From Abvent, developer of Artlantis. Twinmotion will have longer rendering time for more photoreal output while Artlantis shots for quick output with good-enough render. Fee - Windows. Specializes in natural, 3D scenery - Windows, Mac.

Alex Jenyon - Export SketchUp camera views to E-on's Vue. Exporter Plugin for SketchUp 7 and later which exports Sketchup models, sun direction, and cameras into Vue format. Fee - Windows, Mac. Free exvion - Plugin for Yafaray. Al Hart - Snap a light component to the camera to help align a camera light for rendering. Import COLLADA format models into Maya and 3dsMax. TIG - globally changes materials in model or a selection.

- Copy/Paste text: It is now possible to copy from/paste into text blocks. Arabic calligraphy fonts for mac. This makes it easier to prepare designs with the quotes and text you like by copying and pasting it into the text block instead of retyping it.

AdamB - Helps to determine texture density and geometry analysis to help determine adequate detail for rendered scenes. Jim Foltz - SketchUp render style.

RickW - Groups faces by texture for export to other 3D software. Bertschinger - located in the Selection - Layer section - Moves faces to layers based on the assigned material.

thomthom - Collection of material control tools to manage material usage. vodkamartini - Reads material attributes assigned by the Maxwell renderer plugin. TIG - Moves the component origin of any component in the model to the world origin. TIG.

AdamB - Converts the Podium material and light source settings to a LightUp format. Raylectron - Exports model textures to a directory. Free - Windows. Matt666 - V-Ray specific material plugin, but others may need it too.

Sends entourage models directly to rendering engines, bypassing SketchUp, help keeping SketchUp file lightweight. Fee. Dale Martens - Multi-function UV tool which can export and import UVs using third-party UV mapping software. Fee - Windows, Mac. Tomasz Marek - SketchUp Exporter to Kerkythea.

Exports materials to a folder. UV Mapping. thomthom - Tools for inspecting normals and UV mapping. Dale Martens (Whaat) - The Pro version of UVTools - Fee. thomthom - Suite of UV mapping tools.

Dale Martens (Whaat) - A SketchUp plugin for simple image mapping. Free. Didier Bur and others - Exports all of the model's materials (including any unused ones) as individual image files (jpg, etc.) into the model's folder. Exchange downloads. Free. Fee. Downloads, tips and tutorials.

Free and Fee. zbyg - deviantART.com downloads. including HDRi tutorials. 360° sky maps.

Free and Fee. hdrlabs Free and Fee. Free and Fee. SketchUp Sage listing for skyboxes, UV mapping. Converting programs.

Capable of converting HDRi to a jpg with less color depth. Windows. try clicking on the small image previews on Luminance HDR.

It will auto tonemap your 32-bit image with some presets (the previews are the presets):. click the one you like the most. change resolution on the left panel. hit tonemap for new resolution.

save image as jpg. Capable of converting HDRi to a jpg with less color depth. Free, donation-ware. Windows, Mac IES LIght Files.

This entry was posted on 30.09.2019.